Medical Career Training: Meet the Needs of Today’s Retiring Baby Boomers

Medical Career Training: Meet the Needs of Today’s Retiring Baby Boomers post image

The baby boomer generation is nearing retirement. In fact, it’s already happening. They are retiring in droves: a whopping 10,000 every day, according to U.S. News & World Report.

This is no secret. But what may be something you haven’t considered is this: as the baby boomers get older, the more medical care they will need.

That’s simply one of the invariable facts of life. We age, our body breaks down and we need more care to keep us going.
So, as they age, medical care is going to becoming increasingly more important and frequent. As a result of this, hospitals, urgent care centers and other medical care facilities will face (and are already facing) a surge of new patients and an overwhelming increase in the frequency of their visits. And, as a consequence of the increase, medical care facilities across the board will need to hire new medical care staff to be able to care for the patients.

Plus, it’s important because we care. These individuals are our parents, our elders, members of our community. We need to be able to provide the medical care they will require as they get older. The good news is that there is something we can do about it: start a career in the health care industry, and meet the needs of those we care about.

Medical Career Opportunities to Meet the Needs of Today’s Retiring Generation

Pharmacy Technician

The projected rate of change in employment for pharmacy technicians from 2010-2020 is 32%, much higher than the average for all occupations, which is at 14% (BLS).

Duties of a pharmacy technician include verifying prescriptions, retrieving, counting, pouring, mixing and measuring medications, preparing insurance claims and much more.

Work in a variety of difference locations, including retail pharmacies, grocery stores, department stores, hospitals and many others.

You can pursue your career as a pharmacy technician online, from the comfort of your own home, or local coffee shop.

Medical Billing

The projected rate of change in employment for medical billers from 2010-2020 is 21%, higher than the average for all occupations, which is at 14% (BLS).

Career paths for medical billers vary, including medical billing specialists, claims examiner, medical billing office manager, reimbursement specialist and many more.
Like pharmacy techs, medical billers work in a variety of settings, including long-term care facilities, rehab centers, outpatient clinics and many others.

You can start today! 100% online and fully flexible medical billing training is available now.

Medical Coding

The projected rate of change in employment for medical billers from 2010-2020 is 21%, higher than the average for all occupations, which is at 14% (BLS).

Tasks include gathering patient information, checking medical charts, analyzing data and using official coding guidelines to translate medical symptoms, diagnoses and procedures.

You don’t need decades of education to get started. There are comprehensive medical coding certificate programs online, that are convenient, budget-friendly and career-specific.

These career opportunities, as they are filled with bright, new medical superstars, will go a long way toward helping the baby boomer/retiring generation. That is, without a doubt, a great place to start.

Nōn Wels is the Marketing Copywriter for Allied Business Schools, which comprises Allied Schools (career training), Allied American University (online degrees) and Allied National High School (college prep). Nōn creates content for the web (at MedicalBillingCourses.com and elsewhere), print and for Allied’s myriad of social media networks. He’s fond of running, grammar, science fiction and licorice.
3 comments… add one
  • I guess the medical profession will always be in demand. Every generation gets old and all people needs medical care regardless of age anyway. The field of medicine is very broad and people can always find a career opportunity here. 🙂

  • Non Wels

    Hi Ira,

    Good point. It’s certainly a cyclical thing. I would say, however, that with the baby boomers, we do have quite a bit more statistically. But you are absolutely right. We’ll always need quality medical care professionals. 🙂

    Cheers,
    Non

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